Monday, April 8, 2013

Cecropia Moth

This Cecropia Moth (hyalophora cecropia) hatched at Bluebonnet Swamp recently. According to Wikipedia, this is North America's largest native moth, from the Giant Silk Moth family. These nocturnal moths are designed merely to reproduce, lacking working mouth parts and digestive systems. Their lifespan is about 2 weeks. The female emits powerful pheromones to attract a mate which the male can detect up to a mile away. Mating lasts all day, starting in the early morning hours and ending in the evening. Afterward, the female lays up to one hundred eggs which hatch into tiny black caterpillars. Isn't our world fascinating?


Cocoon and moth on Cypress branch 


Many thanks to the hosts of

40 comments:

Chatty Crone said...

That is plain and simply AWESOME. sandie

EG CameraGirl said...

It's a very attractive moth. Your photos are great!

TexWisGirl said...

amazing creature!

Rosemary Aubut said...

Extremely gorgeous photos Gail! Our world is truly wonderful!

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

What a gorgeous yet fleeting creature. Amazing photos.

Linda said...

I almost envy you this moth more than the baby owls. Do you think this one had just emerged from that cocoon and was still drying its wings? It's so amazingly beautiful! Thanks so much for posting this set of images.

Jori said...

I have never seen anything like this before! Amazing! Thank you so much for sharing the info on the moths.

She Who Carries Camera said...

Kind of sad their time here is so short! Great shots!

Karen said...

Oh, what a great looking moth! Fab shots Gail!

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

Beautiful moth. There is a never ending supply of fascination in nature.

Cindy said...

Fantastic looking moth. Interesting markings and facts.

Deanna said...

I saw one of these one time and what fascinated me was their legs...I couldn't figure out what it was...thanks for the info and the gorgeous pictures.

hootnonny said...

Fascinating lesson in nature. Wonderful images.

Brian King said...

Excellent detail! It's a very cool looking moth! Nice catch, too. I don't know if I would have noticed it.

Linda said...

Marvelous pictures! I love how we can see their fuzziness.

Barbara Shallue said...

What a fantastic find! It is just beautiful!

Stewart M said...

Great biological story - our world is enriched by these strange and wonderful animals - even if the big mammals and birds get all the glory!

Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

Karen @ Pieces of Contentment said...

I've never seen anything like it Gail. It looks massive. How big would you say this one was?

Nancy Claeys said...

I'd love to see one up close in person -- this is the next best thing. xo

photographic-sketchbook said...

Lovely pictures. It's fascinating to see a moth so close up and just after hatching.

Shug said...

How interesting....such a beautiful moth. Seems so sad for them to only have a 2 week life span.
How is Barbara? I thought I had seen my very first owl this past Sunday night...only to find out that it was a decoy. :(

Fun60 said...

It's a beautiful moth. I love its markings.

Anna said...

Awesome captures of the this beautiful moth, Gail!
I loveit very much...
Warm greeting from Holland,
Anna :))

Tree Hugger - Suzan said...

So awesome and symmetrical! He/she had a good winter coming out with the fat belly!

Tricia said...

Wow, such great photos! It seems sad that they only live a few weeks.

Linda R said...

That really is pretty amazing. Loving your photos my friend.

Hugs~

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

A beautiful moth! And what a life..that's really cutting out all the extraneous stuff isn't it! Our world is truly full of amazing stories; thanks for sharing this one and the wonderful pictures.

Evelyn S. said...

I'm fascinated by these facts...such a short lifespan for such a beautiful creature. I know of other moths with equally short lives....and also missing what we would consider essential parts!

Stephanie said...

Very interesting, Gail. Your photos are unbelievable! Some of my favorites :) Beautiful, my friend!

Hugs,
Stephanie

Amy Burzese said...

Fantastic! Thanks for sharing with us.

Renae at simple sequins said...

OH OOOOOH OOOOOOOOH These photographs are astounding! The tree branches look plastic. I know they aren't but the focus on the butterfly and it's fuzziness is superb! WOW! JUST WOW!

Gail, listen. Every time I read your comments I always chuckle inside because you comment on my humor and you get it. You pick up on it. Then ...when I come to make a reply to you about your humor, I get here and AM BLOWN AWAY by your excellent posts, then I forget what I was going to say.

It's true! Your photography is REMARKABLE. Your ship has already come in.

♥ (hug)

Carole M. said...

amazing photographs; such a beautiful, handsome moth. I wonder what it's feeding on (the name of that tree?)

Nancy said...

You capture so much of the beauty of God's creation and I love coming for a visit to see what you are going to show us.....

These shots are amazing....

Patrice said...

I remember seeing one of those things flying by my window and thinking it was a bird!

Cloudia said...

delightful!



ALOHA from Honolulu
Comfort Spiral
~ > < } } ( ° > <3

Andrea said...

It is so lovely, i guess it is related to our Atlas moth, although Atlas is much much larger. However, the color of this one is more beautiful as the atlas is more of the browns.

Mitzi said...

I don't believe I've ever seen such a huge moth before and the colors are stunning. Great captures. PS. we had a major crash on the site...so had to redo EVERYTHING ugg...I know...you can't keep up...sorry...this one was beyond my control though. Big hugs my friend...hope to see you over at http://www.wihtinthemoments.com

Optimistic Existentialist said...

More beautiful even than a butterfly!!!

Rosie Grey said...

Thanks so much for this interesting post, Gail! It's indeed fascinating! Wonderful photos, too!

David Oliver said...

I somehow missed this one, amazing shots!